Private Pilot

Private Pilot Course

The Private Pilot Rotorcraft/Helicopter course is taught using our Principles of Helicopter Flight Private Pilot Syllabus for Part 141 and Part 61 Certification. The course is highly structured and gives a detailed, step by step guide for the Student and Instructor to succesfully complete the course at or very close to the FAA minimum ground & flight times.

Privileges and Limitations

This program is intended for those students who are interested in learning to fly as a hobby, or who are planning to purchase their own helicopter. It is also the first step towards a Commercial Pilot Rating. A Private Pilot license allows you to fly a helicopter and carry passengers, although not for compensation or hire. You may share your operating expenses with your passengers.

How Long Will It Take?

The length of time that is required to complete the Private Pilot course depends largely on your ability, motivation to learn, the amount of time you dedicate to studying and your proficiency with the English language. It usually takes about eight weeks to complete the Private Pilot helicopter course if a reasonably full schedule is maintained.

.

.

.

Eligibility Requirements

  • US Citizen
    • Provide a current Government Issued photo ID and birth certificate or a valid US Passport
  • Non-US Citizen
    • Valid Passport
    • Obtain an M1 Visa
    • Register with the TSA (Transportation Safety Administration)
  • Be at least 17 years of age
  • Be able to read, speak, write and understand the English language
  • Obtain an FAA medical certificate
  • Pass an FAA written examination, the written exam is not required for a Helicopter add-on rating
  • Obtain a minimum of 40 hours of flight time including 10 hours of solo
  • Pass an FAA oral and flight test

.

FAA Private Pilot Aeronautical Experience Requirements

Must log a minimum of 40 hours flight time in a helicopter, which includes the following:

  • 20 hours of dual flight instruction, including:
    • 3 hours of dual cross-country flight
    • 3 hours of dual night flight training, including:
      • A cross-country flight of over 50 nautical mile total distance
      • 10 takeoffs and landings at night to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport
  • 10 hours of solo flight time, including:
    • 3 hours of cross-country time, including:
      • One solo cross-country 3 hours of cross-country flight of at least 75 nautical miles total distance, with landings at a minimum of three points, and one segment of the flight being a straight-line distance of at least 25 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations, and
      • Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower
  • 3 hours in a helicopter in preparation for the FAA practical test within the 60-day period preceding the date of the test

The bottom line of the FAA regulations is that they require a minimum of 40 hours of flight training, as well as a passing grade of 70% or better on a written examination, successfully passing an FAA oral examination and a flight test. Due to the volume of knowledge and the level of skill required, very few students are ready to take the test at 40 hours of flight training. A more realistic estimate is 50 to 70 hours of flight training and 20 to 40 hours of ground training.

.

.

.

Private Pilot Add-on Helicopter Rating

30 hours minimum flight time in a helicopter, which includes the following:

  • 20 hours of dual flight instruction, including:
    • 3 hours of dual cross-country flight
    • 3 hours of dual night flight training, including:
      • A cross-country flight of over 50 nautical mile total distance
      • 10 takeoffs and landings at night to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport
  • 10 hours of solo flight time, including:
    • 3 hours of cross-country time, including:
      • One solo cross-country 3 hours of cross-country flight of at least 75 nautical miles total distance, with landings at a minimum of three points, and one segment of the flight being a straight-line distance of at least 25 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations, and
    • Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower
    • 3 hours in a helicopter in preparation for the FAA practical test within the 60-day period preceding the date of the test

The Private Pilot Add-on Helicopter Rating can realistically be obtained at 30 to 40 hours of flight training and 15 to 20 hours of ground training. This of course depends on your overall aviation experience, your ability and skill level and the effort you put into the program. You are not required to take the FAA written examination.

.

Flight Training
The Private Pilot flight training course is divided into three phases:

PHASE 1 (Pre-solo)
The object of this phase is to train you to the level where you can safely perform all the basic flight maneuvers and procedures. You will learn to hover and then pickup and set down the helicopter. You will practice take offs, landings, traffic patterns, and radio work. When you and your instructor are ready, it will be time for the big step — your first solo. You will start your big day with a few traffic patterns with your flight instructor to be sure you feel comfortable. When you land, your instructor will get out and watch you repeat the maneuvers. You will pick the helicopter up to a hover, this time all on your own, and execute a few more traffic patterns before returning to your instructor, a new person and ready for stage II.

PHASE II (Student Pilot)
During this phase you will develop your skills in the basic maneuvers. Between solo flights you will fly with your instructor who will introduce you to the advanced maneuvers and the principles of cross-country navigation. This is probably the most exciting part of the training, since you now get a chance to put the skills you have acquired to practical use. During this period your instructor will also teach you the techniques of night flying and mountain flying.

PHASE III (Pre-Check ride)
This consists of the last few hours of dual instruction, during which your instructor assists in refining your skills in preparation for the practical test. No new maneuvers are introduced during this phase; most of the emphasis is on accuracy and judgment. This phase ends with the check ride which is given by an FAA designated examiner.

.

.

.

Ground School

All students must pass the FAA written examination as well as an FAA oral examination on their check ride. As preparation you will receive a minimum of 20 hours of one-on-one ground instruction with your flight instructor. You can figure on spending 1 hour of ground for every 2 hours of flight training. If you already hold a Private Pilot (Airplane) Certificate, you will not have to take another written test for helicopters.

We require that all of our student’s successfully pass their written examination prior to their first solo flight. It is our goal to insure that all of our students pass their written examination with a passing grade of 90% or better. We have developed a training strategy that allows our students to achieve this level of success, time and time again.

Medical Requirements

Prior to your first solo flight you must obtain a Class III Medical Certificate. It is our belief that you should obtain your Medical Certificate and Student Pilot Certificate as soon as you decide to train for your Private Pilot Rating. In the unlikely event that you are not able to pass the medical exam, you will not have spent your time and money on training. Your instructor will assist you in finding an appropriately-certified physician to administer the necessary examination.

.